Victorian Coal – Fuelling the climate crisis since the 1800s

Victoria still gets 70% of its electricity from three outdated and unreliable coal-fired power stations.

Victoria still gets 70% of its electricity from three outdated and unreliable coal-fired power stations.

Coal is Victoria’s #1 climate polluter
Burning coal is the single biggest source of climate pollution in Victoria. And we have the most polluting coal power station in all of Australia: Yallourn.
Victoria still burns a lot of coal
70% of Victoria’s electricity still comes from burning coal. Burning coal is locking us into catastrophic heating, fires and extreme weather.
Coal is poisoning our air and water
Burning coal releases dangerous chemicals like mercury, lead, arsenic and sulphur dioxide which poison the air we breathe. The Latrobe Valley has the highest concentrations of these pollutants in Victoria, hurting the local community.
Victorian coal is lining the pockets of billionaires
Yallourn is owned by an overseas billionaire. Big coal energy corporations like AGL, Alinta and Energy Australia make mega profits while Victorians struggle with high electricity bills and the local community suffers from health impacts.
The Victorian Government still supports coal, and communities are being left behind
The Andrews Labor Government has extended the licenses of Victoria’s coal-fired power stations in Victoria until 2032 and 2048, but has no proper plan to support coal workers and communities as we transition to clean energy.
Victorian coal is making people sick and making climate change worse.
Just like we got rid of asbestos in buildings, and lead in children’s toys, coal’s time is now up.
Coal is Victoria’s #1 climate polluter
Burning coal is the single biggest source of climate pollution in Victoria. And we have the most polluting coal power station in all of Australia: Yallourn.
Victoria still burns a lot of coal
70% of Victoria’s electricity still comes from burning coal. Burning coal is locking us into catastrophic heating, fires and extreme weather.
Coal is poisoning our air and water
Burning coal releases dangerous chemicals like mercury, lead, arsenic and sulphur dioxide which poison the air we breathe. The Latrobe Valley has the highest concentrations of these pollutants in Victoria, hurting the local community.
Victorian coal is lining the pockets of billionaires
Yallourn is owned by an overseas billionaire. Big coal energy corporations like AGL, Alinta and Energy Australia make mega profits while Victorians struggle with high electricity bills and the local community suffers from health impacts.
The Victorian Government still supports coal, and communities are being left behind
The Andrews Labor Government has extended the licenses of Victoria’s coal-fired power stations in Victoria until 2032 and 2048, but has no proper plan to support coal workers and communities as we transition to clean energy.
Victorian coal is making people sick and making climate change worse.
Just like we got rid of asbestos in buildings, and lead in children’s toys, coal’s time is now up.
The good news?
We don’t need coal anymore.
There are solutions available right now that can power Victoria with 100% clean energy, create jobs and support workers and communities as we transition away from coal.
A lot more large-scale wind and solar
Victoria has made good progress building new wind and solar energy, but we need three times what the Victorian Government has planned in order to replace coal by 2030. Building more publicly owned large-scale renewable energy – like Australia’s first offshore wind farm off the Gippsland coast – would create thousands of new jobs and bring energy back into public hands.
Fair transition for coal communities
If the Victorian Government invests in a proper transition plan for coal workers and their communities, we can ensure that the Latrobe Valley maintains its proud history as an energy-generating region. For example, we could fund a centre for innovation in renewable energy and locate publicly owned big batteries and energy storage in the Valley.
Provide solar for everyone
By putting solar on every public housing home in Victoria, and building ‘solar gardens’ for renters, we can ensure everyone has access to cheap, clean solar energy. This will help Victoria to replace coal with 100% renewable energy.
A clean manufacturing revolution
Victoria can regain its reputation as a manufacturing powerhouse by adopting zero-emissions technology from around the world, doing more to fix up our grid, and building more renewables. For example, Portland’s aluminium smelter could be upgraded to become a ‘reverse battery’ that reduces its power use on hot days when Victorian homes need more energy.
Comfy homes and lower bills!
While the Victorian Government has made some good investments in energy efficiency, we can do more to provide grants and incentives to all Victorian households and industry to save energy and switch away from gas appliances. We must also ensure new homes aren’t locked into expensive, polluting gas.
The good news?
We don’t need coal anymore.
There are solutions available right now that can power Victoria with 100% clean energy, create jobs and support workers and communities as we transition away from coal.
A lot more large-scale wind and solar
Victoria has made good progress building new wind and solar energy, but we need three times what the Victorian Government has planned in order to replace coal by 2030. Building more publicly owned large-scale renewable energy – like Australia’s first offshore wind farm off the Gippsland coast – would create thousands of new jobs and bring energy back into public hands.
Fair transition for coal communities
If the Victorian Government invests in a proper transition plan for coal workers and their communities, we can ensure that the Latrobe Valley maintains its proud history as an energy-generating region. For example, we could fund a centre for innovation in renewable energy and locate publicly owned big batteries and energy storage in the Valley.
Provide solar for everyone
By putting solar on every public housing home in Victoria, and building ‘solar gardens’ for renters, we can ensure everyone has access to cheap, clean solar energy. This will help Victoria to replace coal with 100% renewable energy.
A clean manufacturing revolution
Victoria can regain its reputation as a manufacturing powerhouse by adopting zero-emissions technology from around the world, doing more to fix up our grid, and building more renewables. For example, Portland’s aluminium smelter could be upgraded to become a ‘reverse battery’ that reduces its power use on hot days when Victorian homes need more energy.
Comfy homes and lower bills!
While the Victorian Government has made some good investments in energy efficiency, we can do more to provide grants and incentives to all Victorian households and industry to save energy and switch away from gas appliances. We must also ensure new homes aren’t locked into expensive, polluting gas.
Join the campaign for a 100% renewable Victoria
Join the campaign for a 100% renewable Victoria
Sign up if you support a Victoria powered by 100% clean energy, not coal and gas.
Sign up if you support a Victoria powered by 100% clean energy, not coal and gas.
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A Green New Deal for Victoria
100% renewable energy is one aspect of a Green New Deal for Victoria – a plan that will tackle climate change, address inequality, and build a caring society and a clean economy, while creating the jobs we need.
A Green New Deal for Victoria
100% renewable energy is one aspect of a Green New Deal for Victoria – a plan that will tackle climate change, address inequality, and build a caring society and a clean economy, while creating the jobs we need.

A campaign of Australian Greens Victoria.
Authorised by E. Sandell, 1/45 William St, Melbourne VIC 3000.

The Victorian Greens acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we live and work. We acknowledge the people of Gunaikurnai, whose country has been harmed by more than 200 years of coal mining and coal pollution. Sovereignty has never been ceded. This always was and always will be Aboriginal land.